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escalates the fight on the w economy. is the debt ceiling negotiable? your thoughts? send us a tweet or post your comment on facebook. you can also send us an e-mail. president obama held his last official news conference of the first term yesterday in the east room of the white house. here's what he had to say on the debt ceiling debate. [video clip] >> republicans and congress have two choices. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect ransomed in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people well-being is not a leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states is not a bargaining chip. they had better choose quickly, because time is running short. the last time republicans in congress even flirted with this idea, r. triple-a credit rating was downgraded for the first time in our mystery, our businesses created the few jobs in any month in nearly the past three years, and the whole fiasco added to the deficit. ho
debt ceiling, which will come into play. so we will be seeing a lot of activity in the next few months, debates about people criticize the government, about the size of the deficit, and it a lot of back and forth over these three issues. without going into all the different ramifications, i want to say one word about the debt ceiling, which is not everybody understands what the debt ceiling is about. the debt ceiling -- raising the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay its existing bills. it does not create new deficits. it does not create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family which is trying to improve its credit ratings and i know how we can save money, we will not pay our credit card bills. not the most effective way to improve your credit rating. it was a very slow solution to the debt ceiling in august of 2011 that got the u.s. downgraded last time. so it's very important. all these issues are important, but it's very, very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling
coming up is the so-called debt ceiling -- something most americans hadn't even heard of before two years ago. i want to be clear about this. the debt ceiling is not a question of authorizing more spending. raising the debt ceiling does not authorize more spending. it simply allows the country to pay for spending that congress has already committed to. these are bills that have already been racked up and we need to pay them. so while i'm willing to compromise and find common ground over how to reduce our deficits, america cannot afford another debate with this congress about whether or not they should pay the bills they've already racked up. if congressional republicans refuse to pay america's bills on time, social security checks and veterans' benefits will be delayed. we might not be able to pay our troops, or honor our contracts with small business owners. food inspectors, air traffic controllers, specialists who track down loose nuclear material wouldn't get their paychecks. investors around the world will ask if the united states of america is, in fact, a safe bet. markets could go h
the u.s. economy and the fed's role in monetary policy. he called on congress to raise the debt ceiling in the release of u.s. can pay its bills. he spoke at the gerald ford school of public policy. >> thank you very much. it is also my great pleasure to welcome all of you here today. on behalf of the gerald r. ford school of public policy, the university of michigan is extremely honored to welcome the hon. ben bernanke, chairman of the board of governors of the federal reserve system. today's conversation is the latest in our series of distinguished lectures, policy talks at the fort school. we're so pleased that region white can introduce to the events and we're also very president marye sue: here today as well as -- we also have several of the university's executive officers and beans. i would like to welcome all of them and thank them for joining us today. it is an honor and truly personal pleasure to introduce our next guest. the fed's charges to provide a healthy economy. this is a complex and critically important mission and it makes the person at its helm one of if not the most
the nation's debt ceiling. you saw pete sessions, the rules committee chairman, filing that rule on the house floor a moment ago. they met this afternoon to discuss the flan which would require both chambers of commerce to pass a budget plan by april 15 or have their salaries withheld. the debt at $16.4 trillion. the meeting is an hour and 20 minutes. >> i want to welcome our -- three of our four witnesses that are here. it's always a fun thing to see a star of the show, everybody wants to get their autograph. mr. chairman, welcome to the rules committee. we're delighted that you're here today to discuss h.r. 325, a very important bill. and i noticed the former chairman of the committee, the ranking member, is here. we also welcome her testimony that will begin. we'll give mr. brady a chance to get here, but the chairwoman, the head of the house administration committee, the gentlewoman from michigan, and delighted that you are here. as always, the rules committee is delighted that you've taken time, both we were excited about your presence today. a chance for you to be before the committee a
's in south carolina. and this headline in the aiken standard -- then, on the debt ceiling debate, the ways and means chairman has announced there will be hearings on this on january 22. they will be taking a look and that. also in the newspapers this morning, here's the "washington times with this headline -- " he will be our guest coming up, the top democrat on the ways and means committee in the house. later, we will talk to the chairman of the house judiciary committee, representative goodlatte, on the washington journal this morning as well. two members of congress. continuing with the debt ceiling, the financial times this morning reports -- on the nomination of chuck hagel, a former nebraskahe ka senator.m he won the support of two key members. his opposition so far has come almost entirely from fellow republicans. those are some of the headlines this morning in the papers. back to our question, do you support executive action on gun- control measures? now to an independent caller. caller: hi. i just wonder if there are any human beings left. the underlying issue has very little to d
of representatives faces a vote to increase america's debt ceiling. pending legislation raises the debt ceiling by roughly $300 billion to $400 billion. what protection does america get in return? are there any spending cuts? no. are there policies that spur economic growth in resulting revenue increases? no. does this proposal help fix in any way the trillion dollar deficits that threaten america with financial ruin? no. mr. speaker, i can only speak for me. i will not vote to raise the debt ceiling unless significant efforts are made to fix the underlying problem of deficits and accumulated debt that force debt ceiling votes and risk america's future. i will not vote to raise the debt ceiling unless first congress passes a substantive balanced budget constitutional amendment that solves the debt problem for future generations or, second, we implement sizable spanneding cuts that help get our financial affairs in order. i take this stance full well knowing the adverse economic effects of a failure to raise the debt ceiling, but also knowing, mr. speaker, that those affects pale in comparison t
we're going to do, we're going to pass a three or four-month extension of the debt ceiling. then we're going to get into a fight on the sequester and hold the line of the sequester. this is a promise the leadership is making to us. as long as they keep that promise i think many conservatives will be ok with that. then when we get to the debt ceiling fight we're going to ask for at a minimum the one--- the one-for-one cuts that come from the boehner rule for any long-term debt ceiling extension system of if we look at that, it means that in 10 to 15 years, with very little help from the democrats, we can achieve a balanced budget which is much better than even the 23- to 27 -- better than the 23 years to 27 years and obviously better than the never balancing budget obama and the democrats have proposed for the last four years. so you look at all the data out there. all the public opinion polls say that the american people think we're spending too much money. that the american people think that we are taxing too much. but the problem is that as republicans, i think this goes to what r
the debt ceiling for three months. what this bill will actually do is set a provision that if the senate does not pass that budget in three months then their pay checks would be withheld, so that's the enforcement mechanism. it actually doesn't require any promise that the senate do its budget. there's conceiveably still the thought that they could not do the budget and not get paid. host: so then the house would respond in kind? tell us a little bit then why use this as a mechanism? >> the strategy here is they are trying to go on offense again, because they had a brutal holiday stretch of sort of failed negotiating ploys and in-fighting and they are trying to turn the tables so people will talk about why went to democrats cut spending? one way they can do that is by talking about the fact that the senate hasn't passed a budget in four years. it's uplimited value there's a conventional wisdom that it's not that important but when the people in the country hear that the senate hasn't passed a budget which sounds like a basic failure of their duty and it's an effective talking point the r
to do and authorize an increase in the debt ceiling so we can pay our debts. i think that is what will eventually happen. i do not think the going often the other direction would be that helpful. >> -- that going off in the other direction would be that helpful. >> i am a second year at the board's school. does the debt ceiling still have a practical purpose? could it be eliminated without much consequence? >> it has got symbolic value. maybe one or two other countries, but essentially no other countries and the world have this particular institution. the congress appropriates $100, tells the government to spend $100 on whatever, and then it raises $80 in revenue through its tax code. the arithmetic here says, you have to borrow $20. no, congress has to give a third 100-80 = says the 180at 20. logically, there is got to be something to make up the difference. the way to address it is by having a sensible plan for spending, insensible span foplar revenue. as i was saying before, this is like a family saying, we're spending too much. let's stop paying our credit card bill. that is n
the debt ceiling in a timely manner and providing more clarity on policies could actually generate a boost in confidence and open the door for faster growth in the second half of 2013. looking at the labor market, we see lackluster growth in 2013 wing on job creation. we actually see gains of slowing in the first half of 2013 before picking up. it is a little bit slower than in the 4 1/4 with the doctrines of around 50,000 per month. slower gdp growth is going to be driven, we think, by a consumer that is going to be hobbled by tax increases. we will remain positive in 2013 combined -- in 2013, but not appositive in consumer spending over the fourth quarter the second half will be particularly weighed down by less money in their paychecks. and we think as the year progresses, the strength of the housing market, the while the effects of the home price gains and perhaps to improvement in housing could lead to somewhat stronger consumer spending. we did see a 12% gain in housing starts this morning month over month. 37% year over year. these are strong numbers. we did see improvement in home
the sequestered, the debt ceiling, and you have the continuing resolution. the sequestered and debt ceiling fall on top of each other towards the end of february. these to say and republican leadership and the senate, which is served in for 12 years, you never take a hostage you cannot shoot. the problem with the house was they took hostage the cannot shoot when they took the fiscal cliff. if the republican members of congress take the debt ceiling as a hostage, it is a hostage you cannot shoot. as a very practical matter, if we go over the debt ceiling, we do not increase the debt ceiling, republicans will not win the debate. they will argue they are not increasing it because they do not want to control spending but they will not win the debate. what will happen is the white house will pay with cash flow of the interest on the debt. the debt will not be called. what they might not pay our social security checks. the moment the american citizen figures out they may not go out, the game is over. tenfold. because believe me, though congress can stand up to the senior lobby. so that is not a legiti
as we get to this debt ceiling debate. talk to me, from your perspective, about this notion of compassionate conservatism. there was a movement 12 years ago to present that as an alternative. what happened to that? >> i would be glad to go down that road but i do not think it is useful. in the 1970's, jack was trying to gently develop a real understanding of how to break through at every level, housing, learning, jobs. and who i always told people, as a football quarterback, had showered with more african- americans than most republicans knew, had a deep, passionate commitment with every american he met. his heart was big. he did love everybody, to a point where it drives you crazy. you think, slightly less love, jack, it is ok. the use of it by the bush people was a political slogan to show they are softer than the gingrich republicans. they did not think through any serious, systematic program. i want to commend you. sitting here, i had two ideas, sufficiently radical, that would never have occurred without this conversation -- [applause] i did not say right or left. i jus
the debt ceiling or later on over the continuing resolution to? finance to? -- or the continuing resolution to finance the government? guest: i've only been here two years. i truly believe that when i ran and even more so now, we are a nation at risk. every american, regardless of political affiliation. so we have to reduce federal spending. this is the time right now. some of my colleagues were saying let's get through the fiscal cliff and the real fight is the continuing resolution or the real fight is the debt limit. i hear that and it goes on. host: where do you insist on spending cuts? is that the debt ceiling or the continuing resolution? guest: it is that every point. host: all of the above? guest: yes. when the president says he wants a balanced approach, i believe him. i was looking for the simpson- bowles model, fighting for least 2 to 1. i was hoping for 1 to 1. i was disappointed and deeply surprised we did not get that in this fiscal cliff. here i was as a republican, so often introduced on tv shows and news shows, "coming up, a republican who says we need higher revenues." an
of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they allr today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have you nan hit in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the one we witnessed in newtown 34 days ago cannot be continued to be tolerated. that tragedy has affected the public in a way i have never see
. the way the republicans are threatening to use the debt ceiling delays everything and it puts the perspective in the wrong place. i think it is a serious mistake for them to even think about that. you were talking earlier about the articles this morning saying how dangerous it is to use the debt ceiling to essentially put the full faith and credit of this country in real jeopardy. so i'm very concerned about the consequences of doing that or even threatening to do it immediately and, also, it really shifts the focus, instead of it being on the debt ceiling, it should be elsewhere, including tax reform. host: if tax reform does not happen in 2013 -- guest: it may not happen. host: what is the impact of that? what is the implication? guest: i have said all along it is important for us to look beyond the label "tax reform." for example, we urged early on tax reform bringing the rates down to 25% individual and corporate, they -- without indicating how in the world they would do that. some said, we can use the exemptions and deductions. we have already begun to use them, i hope, i
and pushing us up against the debt ceiling. but remarkably, president obama is now calling for even more taxes, more spending, and more borrowing in return for any future spending controls. he said yesterday that we can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. simply put, the president got his tax increases in the last congress. it's time for this congress to tackle washington's spending bing. i'd like to recognize the gentlelady from indiana. >> mr. chairman, my message otoday is simple. on too many big items, congress has been kicking the can down the road for years. it's time to supply real leadership on the most pressing challenges we face. this is the only way we can restore trust in congress. we're fast approaching a dead end. the social security trust fund will be bankrupt in 20 years. medicare and medicaid are not on a sustainable path. it is wrong for us to make proppingses to the american people we know we cannot keep. ms. brooks: we must address the drivers of our debt, medicare, medicaid, an social security. not because these programs don't have merit and
the congress you are going to see on debt ceiling. the republicans in the house are talking about a short-term view of that. it certainly would avoid disaster coming up for the end of march. you will still have the issue of raising it for the long term. on the republican side there is no real appetite to do that without the reforms. same for gun-control. a lot of the agenda items that the president announced last week, the 23 executive actions you will see taken piece by piece. the easiest one to accomplish will be those that come forward the fastest, and the same for immigration reform. there is a lot that could be done and a comprehensive approach, but i think you will see that come down to the very bare minimum that both sides are able to agree on. >> let me follow up with a vote that will happen on wednesday. that will give another three months and the extension of the debt limit. weird is that position? why delay that for three months? where does that put them in march and april? >> this is an acknowledgement that they have lost the debt ceiling essentially as a leveraged tool they h
back the debt ceiling for about three months, i believe. i was wondering if there was any chance for congress and the president to foster more bipartisanship during the second term? >> i think that will be a major theme of his speech tomorrow. i think he will be speaking out, once again, across the aisle to call for the reaching of common ground on these major issues, like the debt ceiling, the budget, gun-control, immigration, tax reform, those kinds of things. i think it is true that we have a divided government now. it has been a difficult four years, but president obama is a natural conciliate her -- conciliation person, and he will make that a big theme of his second term. i think you will hear some of that tomorrow. >> this is from this morning's "washington post." you can draw an analogy to two former president, franklin roosevelt and dwight eisenhower, finding parallels to what fdr delivered in his second address in 1937, and what eisenhower faced in 1957. >> the roosevelt second inaugural address is interesting to read because it really is of a peace with first inaugural
resolution that is done in the government. we have the debt ceiling. these three major things are going to consume congress because republicans and democrats don't agree how to resolve those. he will become tied up dealing with this and it has to be done. we have to deal with these things. immigration and gun-control, these are things, like a marriage, almost wish list items. i know immigration is a big item appeared that will also be hard to move something that is progressive or liberal with a divided congress, as is gun- control. we all know and assault weapons ban cannot get through the house. it's not going to get through. it is possible they will get background checks. maybe it very scaled-back versions of what the president was talking about yesterday. but in a full-scale, you will not able to get assault weapons ban through. he will not able to get immigration through in the way progressives would like. so that probably will not happen. but the spending will have to be dealt with. sources will be made, in that sense. host: we're talking about president obama's second term. we wan
yesterday talking about the debt limit, debt ceiling. he's talked about our economy. i think it's worth noting that since 1923, when the president was required to furnish a budget in a time deadline given for furnishing that budget, 90 years, 90 years the president is required by law to furnish a budget. since 1923 those, those ensuing 90 years, there were apparently 11 times when presidents have been unable to get the budget to congress as required by law. and most of those -- well, some of those 11, there were very good reasons. but it's interesting to note in the last 90 years, out of the 11 times that the budget from the president has been late, four of those 11 have been under the obama administration. we're also informed that there is a chance once again, like there was a year and a half ago, that our credit rating of the u.s. could be lowered again. by another credit rating agency. some have tried to paint it as a different story, different picture, but for those of us who recall what happened, s&p made it clear that they didn't believe that the united states was serious about de
to call for the reaching of common ground on some of these major issues like the debt ceiling, the budget, gun control, immigration, tax reform, those kinds of things. so i think that it is true that we are -- we have a divided government now. it has been a difficult four years but i think president obama is a natural. i think he will make that a big theme of his second term. i think you will hear some of that tomorrow. host: this is from this morning's "the washington post" who writes a new term, a new obama. he points out and draws an aanalogy to f.d.r. and eisenhower. guest: the roosevelt second inaugural address is interesting to read. it really is at peace with the first inaugural address. this is a president saying i came in with a huge crisis, we're on the right path, we're going to keep going. he has a phrase in there, have we found our happy val valley? i -- valley. i don't read it as being an aggressive speech. he was speaking to the whole country but he wasn't in campaign mode. roosevelt was very good in that way and eisenhower never sounded like he was in campaign mode. guest:
and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. talk didn't come here to about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the one we witnessed in newtown 34 days ago cannot be continued to be tolerated. that tragedy has affected the public psyche in a way i have never seen before. the image of first graders, not only shot,
the debt clock. difficult choices on the debt if the u.s. think it's ceiling. the piece points out by mid february or early march the united states could face an unprecedented default unless it raises the debt ceiling. that was from tim geithner. further into the body of the "new york times" story i want to is share with you some of the numbers "the new york times" points out today. that could happen as early as february 15, if that happens by february 15 or early march, according to the by partisan policy center in analysis of what the government expects is $8 billion in revenue that day but it has $52 billion in spending that day, $6.8 billion in tax refunds, $3.5 in federal salaries, and $1.5 ode to military contractors and other commitments. consider again that day on february 15 f that is the day we reach the limit, the country would not have enough money to pay the bond holders let alone anyone else, more over analysts have raced questions about whether the treasury would be able to reprogram the ought mated payment system to prioritize some payments over others. the role of governm
-- it will be a big party on monday, but after monday as we move toward the debt ceiling conversations and the spending cuts get placed on the table, the poor are likely to take it on the chin. that is why we are here with in washington tonight having this conversation. our hashtag is #povertymustend. our website is afuturewithoutpoverty.com. you'll find a letter on that website -- you can electronically sign it asking the president to give a major public policy address on poverty sooner than later, and second to convene a white house conference on the eradication of poverty to bring experts to get into crafting national plan to cut poverty in half and eradicate it in the richest nation in the world. it is not a skill problem, it is via upawe have the will to the poverty a priority with in this country? >> you have to have the real economy. but we have now? i am amazed -- you could talk about public education, we could talk about health care. everyone knows that a single payer health care system would -- insurance would cover everyone. insurance companies would be gone. cost, quality,
congress deal with the debt ceiling? >> i hope it does not come to that but if it has to, it must. you know we can't let extremists put us in default and play chicken with a full faith and credit with the united states of america. that's what they are. when people say let's go into default. when i hear people who are elected to congress say let's go into default. i say this person is from some other planet. this person is not from this planet. the notion that we would do that boggles the mind and the good common sense of the vast majority of americans. >> what is your perspective on america's melting pot being better reflected in small towns? what would urban leaders learn from small town mayors? >> i mean -- i think we're enriched. i know i am. my kids have grown up. i tell people my kids have been in the homes of iranians, koreans, mexicans, italians, and greeks, muslims, we're enriched when we can experience other cultures and people and other perspectives. i think you're seeing the fastest growing places of immigration are in the small towns across the country. at first, there is tensio
, are you with us? caller tell why does it cost so much for an inauguration when the debt ceiling is so high? why not take those donations and put it towards the debt? guest: de $100 million or so that will be paid by the federal government, when you see the inauguration on television, you are not seeing a lot of that security. these professionals are prepared for all sorts of things to happen. metro in washington, d.c., will be running at rush-hour levels. all of this infrastructure needs to be constructed. host: a question about the money that people give, when you're asked how they could give money to organizing for action. will they be accepting donations? what will the money be used for? guest: they will take the donations and they said how it will be used to organize grass- roots democratic priorities. gun control is a great example. host: we will talk for a moment as the president's motorcade had for the national sert -- the national cemetery. the motorcade makes its way past the hour camera here. -- passed our camera here. >> you can leave your stuff right here. >> ok, do not worry.
. house republicans suspend measure to suspend debt ceiling. until mid may setting the stage for a floor vote as soon as wednesday. they write that the house rules committee posted text of the legislation as washington prepared for president obama's second inauguration. the bill would withhold members' pay if congress fails to pass a budget by april 15. they will hold an emergency meeting to discuss legislation tuesday setting up a vote as soon as wednesday on the house floor. angus is in rose dale, new york on our republican line. go ahead. caller: good evening. i'm sorry. it is agnes. first of all, i would like to thank c-span for giving us such excellent coverage as usual and yes, i am african-american and yes, i am a republican and my parents were republicans and we're from the south. i would like to say that -- a shout out to former president george bush and his family. i love them as well. i hope his family, his father -- they are in our prayers. i saw condoleezza rice today and she was beautiful as usual. i also would like to say that i have been in a dilemma of my party because i
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)